CCMB’s mRNA COVID vaccine more effective against variants


express news service

Hyderabad: Most vaccines, including Covishield and Covaxin, use inactivated viruses that train the human immune system to fight the COVID-19 virus.

But, a proven and improved immune response, a self-amplifying messenger RNA (mRNA), developed by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNtech, prompts the body to make viral proteins.

As India lacked mRNA vaccine technology, CSIR-Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) has indigenously developed an improved version of the mRNA vaccine.

“Unlike inactivated virus vaccines, which may not be effective against changing sequence (variants) of the virus, mRNA vaccines are versatile. mRNA vaccines are proven to combat variants because they target specific proteins that are present in the same organism.” Avoid infection with the organism,” said Dr Madhusudan Rao, CEO, Atal Incubation Centre-CCMB, briefing the media about the new development.

The scientists observed a strong immune response when testing it on mice. “The mice showed a strong immune response to the two doses of mRNA. The generated anti-spike antibodies were found to be 90 percent efficient in inhibiting the human ACE2 receptor that binds itself to the Covid-19 virus,” said Dr. Rajesh Iyer said.

This successful study of indigenous mRNA vaccines could also help in the discovery of vaccines for tuberculosis, dengue and malaria. “With this study, which is currently in the animal-trail-stage, we have shown that we can develop end-to-end mRNA vaccines. Meaning, with significantly less effort, the mRNA technology allows the CCMB to be infected with TB, dengue and TB, dengue, and tuberculosis.” Vaccines for other infectious diseases like malaria can help,” said Dr Vinay Nandikuri, Director, CCMB.

“The idea is not entirely new, but since Moderna has granted India an exemption from its patent, it has become easier for CCMB to achieve success. Several corporations are interested in developing vaccines for various diseases, and CCMB is knowledgeable partners. is ready to cooperate,” the CCMB director said.

Vaccine for TB, Dengue

“With this study, which is currently in the animal-trail-stage, we have shown that we can develop end-to-end mRNA vaccines. Meaning, with significantly less effort, the mRNA technology allows the CCMB to be infected with TB, dengue and TB, dengue, and tuberculosis.” Vaccines for other infectious diseases like malaria can help,” said Dr Vinay Nandikuri, Director, CCMB.

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